Olympic National Park
Visitor Center

Here is your Olympic National Park Visitor Center information and locations, with details about Olympic National Park Ranger Stations and Wilderness Information Centers.

There are three different Visitor Centers located in the 1,442-square-mile Olympic National Park (ONP), all of them on the north and west sides of the Park which get the lion's share of visitors. 

Here are those Olympic National Park Visitor Centers, with information on ranger stations and visitor information centers below.


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Olympic National Park
Visitor Center in Port Angeles

Olympic National Park Visitor Center
3002 Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362
Phone (360) 565-3130
Olympic National Park Website 

This location is open daily, though hours vary according to season. For detailed information on hours and park entrance fees, call (360) 565-3130, or go to ONP Basic Info.

TripAdvisor Reviews of ONP Visitor Center in Port Angeles WA 

The Olympic National Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles is a destination in itself. You’ll find loads of local information, including resources such as books, souvenirs and posters which you can purchase.

The visitor center in Port Angeles contains:

  • Exhibits on salmon, mountain lions, Roosevelt elk, and aboriginal tribal life 
  • Info on backpacking and trip-planning, including trail reports, safety and weather
  • Discovery Room” for children
  • Mosaic of Diversity,” an award-winning 25-minute film, that can be viewed upon request
  • 2 short nature trails through the 38 acre campus

Go adventuring with the kids in the hands-on "Discovery Room," where you'll have as much fun as they will learning about the plants and animals in the area.  They can try on a real ranger hat or troop around in a park volunteer coat.

Learn about the numerous activities for teens in the ONP.  This can include adventures such as backpacking, hiking, and white-water or sea kayaking.

It can also include educational ventures, such as the Natural Resources Elwha River Field Course. This is a three-week summer course which gives high school students the opportunity to work within, and learn about, a local eco-system.

For fun and education for all ages, check out the ranger-led programs, campfire programs and ranger guided interpretive walks that are available throughout the summer at various destinations and campgrounds throughout the Olympic National Park.

The Olympic National Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles is also host to a Wilderness Information Center (Backcountry Permit Office)

3002 Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362
Phone: (360) 565-3100.
Hours: Open daily. Hours vary according to season.

Much more info on Wilderness Information Centers is below.

Click here for ONP Wilderness Travel Basics, which can also be printed.
Or: call (360) 565-3100.


Olympic National Park
Visitor Center at Hurricane Ridge

Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center
Located at Hurricane Ridge, about 17 miles south of Port Angeles on Heart o' the Hills Road.

If possible, do not miss this Olympic National Park Visitor Center!

Just seventeen miles south of Port Angeles, but a mile high, Hurricane Ridge greets you with expansive 360 degree vistas, meadows filled with wildflowers (when not snowy!), distant glaciers and gnarly alpine forests. The Visitor Center is open daily and easily reached by Hurricane Ridge Road, which is open 24 hours a day from mid-May through mid-autumn. 

During winter months, depending on weather and road conditions, the road is scheduled to be open from 9:00 a.m until dusk, Friday through Sunday, holidays falling on Mondays, and additional days during the Christmas season.

Hurricane Ridge has exhibits on Olympic's mountain habitats, including a 20-minute orientation film.

Nature trails are the best way to see the area. Each one has its rewards, from easy to challenging. Summertime offers opportunities for ranger-led programs most days but only on weekends in winter.

Check out the gift shop, get a snack at the snack bar on the lower level and enjoy a picnic in one of the picnic areas located nearby. Or, just be satisfied with the spectacular scenery.

Olympic National Park
Visitor Center in the Hoh Rain Forest

Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center
Approximately 31 miles south of Forks. From Highway 101, turn east on Upper Hoh Road.

Phone: (360) 374-6925

Hours: Open daily in summer; open Friday-Sunday through the remainder of the year. Hours vary according to season, call for specifics. The rangers at this visitor center are highly knowledgeable about the temperate rain forest and the flora and fauna here.

Moss creeps over rocks and fallen trees. Deep and dark and green is the Hoh Rain Forest.

Experience the beauty of this temperate rain forest on self-guided nature trails. Wilderness use permits, animal resistant food containers and additional information are available at this visitor center.

Olympic National Park
Ranger Stations

Ranger stations in the Olympic National Park are either standalone buildings, such as the Storm King Ranger Station (pictured below), or they can also be a counter manned by a park ranger within a Visitor Center, such as at Hurricane Ridge, Port Angeles, or the Hoh Rain Forest.

The ranger station is the designated location where park rangers can be found to answer questions about the park and the area, from road and trail conditions, to what wild animals to watch out for, to "where can I find a restroom, please?"

Here's where you can find other ranger stations in the Olympic National Park:

Contact the Port Angeles Visitor Center with any additional questions.

Park Rangers

So You Know: The concept of a park ranger originates with 14th century England where men were employed to roam land owned by the Crown, to watch over and prevent theft from poachers. 

In more modern days, the National Park Service adopted the name from "Roger's Rangers," a group that fought in the 1755 French and Indian War. 

According to the first Director of the National Park Service, Stephen T. Mather:

"They are a fine, earnest, intelligent, and public-spirited body of men, these rangers. Though small in number, their influence is large. Many and long are the duties heaped upon their shoulders. If a trail is to be blazed, it is 'send a ranger.' If an animal is floundering in the snow, a ranger is sent to pull him out; if a bear is in the hotel, if a fire threatens a forest, if someone is to be saved, it is 'send a ranger'..." (Source: www.wikipedia.org)

 




Olympic National Park
Wilderness Information Centers

If you have plans to hike and camp in the back country of the Olympic National Park, you'll need a permit and possibly additional information, all of which can be had at a Wilderness Information Center.

They provide:

  • Back-country permits for the entire ONP
  • Advance reservations for limited use wilderness areas
  • Any sort of planning assistance for your camping expedition into the back country, including trail info and conditions and any safety questions you may have
  • Bear canisters on loan ($3 donation requested to help with educational programs)
  • Free tide charts
  • Topographic maps, guide books, and field guides for sale


Wilderness Information Centers can be found at these locations:

  1. Olympic Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles
  2. Quinault Rain Forest (South Shore Ranger Station)
  3. Staircase Ranger Station

ONP Wilderness Permits Information

More information about Wilderness Information Centers here 

Getting Around: Mileage Chart for the Olympic National Park



Other links you may like:


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